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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus. the garden was designed by thoma
is experimenting with is a program that dhs science and technology created and if you are ready to write it down, you can look online, you can google it, it's called the next generation incident command system or nics. it's a command and control web-based tool that we're looking with mit lincoln labs and dss and i would foresee when we stand up our wing operation center at miramar that the marine corps liaison and the navy liaison and if need be the guard liaison would have access to that tool. the next generation command system is a fantastic web-based command and control technology that we expect to use in the future. with that, thank you. >> thanks. colonel yeager. >> i just want to say you can't underestimate the risk presented by these environments we fly in and really the relationships that we build with cal fire and the training prepares us to mitigate that risk. as rear admiral riveras said, bad things tend it happen at night. they also happen on the weekend and i think we have a 3-day week jepld here but i assure you we are ready to respond. >> from personal experience in 2007, i
's not a pure science. i have seen remarkable enthusiasm. when you see this kind of enthusiasm, you got people really all pump up. if you think about four years ago, had you the democrats in the same spot. they were so excited about the opportunity. now you see republicans trading places with them. i see republicans a lot more enthusiastic, a lot more excited than i see the democrats right now. the other thing is, i think there is a sense that what has happened in ohio, we balanced our budget. we have cut taxes. we've tamed our regulators, not to the point if they don't see a problem they don't jump on it, they do. we have the toughest regulations on hydraulic fracking in america. it's the regulators and towns and pounds small businesses. they understand we can't keep doing what we've been doing. >> sean: ohio more than any other state has been subjected to president's hope and change and new tone in washington. he was going to part the ways and all this other stuff. they have been subjected to the people in your great state to probably the greatest smear, slander campaign with more money spen
and they did a parody of the political science final. please write a scenario where world events and powers provide and results in total thermonuclear warfare results and the next question was, please create a lab practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an earthquake and the initial problem was crush injuries. yes, infection and dysentery and water supply and all those things would follow fairly soon, but the initial catastrophe was crush injuries, trauma, and the hospitals were gone. so what did we do? the world responded as best it could. what we did, the naval maritime forces, we sent our balts group down there which was patroling the area, we sent the hospital ship comfort down. so you have the comfort on the east coast, you have the mercy on the west coast. the mercy is parked down in san diego. it just got back from its asian humanitarian assistance from guam, indonesia, vietnam, an amazing number of nations we're partnering with. those hospital ships with 1,000 beds, 12 operatin
that the national academy of sciences a few years ago made clear that there is no safe level of radiation exposure. so, it doesn't matter if it's the same as background radiation. every time a child goes out and breathes in even one particle of radioactive material, that is an increased exposure and with every increased exposure the danger goes up. background has nothing to do with it. so, that's just an example of the platitudes. now, i sent you all an e-mail and hopefully you read it. i want to touch on the most important things we need to do to deal with the fact that staff is not telling us, and agencies are not telling us the right things about this problem. first of all, both treasure island and the shipyard projects need to be halted until independent investigations happen so that we are not depending on these agencies. the shipyard on treasure island need to be fully characterized for all toxic and radioactive contamination and no development should be allowed until both are cleaned up to residential standards the way prop p says. and most importantly, the newly created redevelopment succe
of the political science final. please write a scenario where world events and powers provide and results in total thermonuclear warfare results and the next question was, please create a lab practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an
this election will look at what went wrong and what went right, after this. it is science and they are very talented people. a lot of times they are very accurate. i will say that, it you are for one candidate or another, there is your own emotions that play into this sometimes, if so you will see a poll that maybe is not favorable to you and your party and sometimes your emotions can play into it. for the most part, particularly with these averages, they are generally accurate. host: we did a segment yesterday about understanding polls during the campaign season. if your interested, go to c- span.org and we have the pew research director talked about how and why polls are done. now to thomas in little home, texas, republican -- in little elm. caller: i want to know, for everyone out there, i know people that go to college, whether their parents paid for it or day paige ford themselves, they're very proud they went to college. i cannot figure out why obama, and his wife, have hidden their records and sealed them. guest: well, i don't want to comment directly on that, necessarily, but i will
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >> sean: as both candidates head into the final stretch of the campaign there is one critical state that could hold the keys not white house for governor romney and that is the state of ohio. historically no republican candidate has won the election without taking this battleground state. the latest poll shows governor romney in a dead heat with the president both at 48% and as obama is relying mainly on the quote auto bailout for a victor arery in the state, voters are more concerned about the overall economy. romney is leading obama when it comes to the handling of the economy. joining us is michael barone. what do you think? >> what is happening in ohio? well, this was one of the three firewall states. the obama campaign wanted to concentrate on three states where they got the lowest winning percentages in 2008 except for indiana and north carolina which they conceded, florida, ohio and virginia. since the october 3 debate, florida seems to be gone toward mitt romney. he has been winning almost all polls this. vir
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> sean: joining me are two men trying to get to the bottom of the lies and coverup. so we just heard from charles woods the father of this american hero. here is a navy seal he s a mile away he is not at the consulate. he hears the cries for help. he is told to stand down twice. he puts his military career, his life in jeopardy and then gives his life because he is not -- and saves about what, 30 people. how is it possible that -- and he was killed 7 hours later. how is it possible congressman issa that everybody was requesting help before and during and no help came. how is that possible? >> as you know, our men and women in uniform believe that you respond and you don't believe people out there unprotected and certainly don't leave people behind. he was doing the right thing and i think his father deserves to be outraged that 7 hours passed and while overhead predator aircraft could see what was going on no aircraft, no is support was brought in to protect these men and women that could ha
with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the d.e.a. to do a really radical thing. that would be to use science in determining what substances will and will not be scheduled. because marijuana is on a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the schedule. [applause] anded same goes for -- and the same goes for hemp, which is also a substance for which there are no bad drug effects. there are no bad health and safety effects. yet there are important health benefits. marijuana should be regulated but not in
him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> bill: lou's the boss segment tonight. according to the social security administration, the number of measure workers currently on disability all time high in this country. during president obama's term an average of almost 1,000 disability claims every day have been put on the books. here now to explain why, fox news business anchor lou dobbs. okay. look, we know that people get hurt on the job. >> sure. >> or they have debilitating diseases and they can't work anymore. that's a fact. but now it's the highest level in history and we're supposed to have the best medicine in the world so what's going on? >> there is only one logical explanation. and as people have looked at this, is it's risen 20% under the total number of dependents receiving disability. there is only one plausible explanation. and that is that the administration has made dependency a watch word of its administration. and, therefore, they have reduced the standards forever pe
to serve so that one man ended up serving at the st. louis science center. adam burt ended up setting up his own nonprofit. serve with habitat for humanity. a youth hockey coach in football coach. it at the mission continues and did an in the white house with the first lady's office for her joining forces initiative. it ended up becoming a biology teacher for part of her. and what happened was for all of them, they started to serve again and took on this challenge of finding a way to continue to serve on their new frontline. and what we found ed the mission continues is that all of them have been able to serve as inspiration for young people are around the country. and i finished the book, i finish the book with this challenge for young people. you pause over the last page. you don't -- your own life feels fill the possibility. you think about the kind of story that you might tell one day about your life, your love, your service, your ventures. the road before you is long. you will wind up steep hills and down to low valleys. there will be moments of spectacular beauty along the way and
. find a way to continue to serve so that josh ended up serving at the st. louis science center. adam, who was hit by the mortar round set up his own nonprofit. julian served with habitat for humanity, sean became a youth hockey coach and football coach. ian smith did a fellowship at the police continues and then did an internship and the white house with the first lady's office for her joining forces initiative. melissa steinman became a biology teacher, and for all of them, they started to serve again and took on this challenge of finds a way to continue to serve on the new front line. and what we found at the mission continues, is all of them have been able to serve as inspiration for young people around the country. and i finish the book with this challenge for young people. you pause over the last page. your own life feels filled with possibilities. you think about the kind of story that you might tell one day about your life, your love, your service, your adventure. the road before you is long. it will wind up steep hills and down into low valleys. moments of spectacular beauty
, schools give a break to students who major in math and science and those are most needed for florida's job market and undergrads studying political science, they have fewer job prospects in the state. >> alisyn: lady liberty. >> cool. >> alisyn: the statue's 126 anniversary and the celebration opening up to the public after a year long renovation and 30 million dollar project including remodeling the staircase to make it easier for visitors to climb and to climb, that was tough. and 26,000 more people visit each other. >> you climbed up and only made it up to the commissar i. >> alisyn: i was exhausted. >> clayton: can i get a coffee? and they put an elevator in there for handicapped individual who never before had a chance to go up and see a portion of the statue of liberty. today it could be open until it's closed later today by the federal government because of-- and meanwhile we have been talking over the last month what happened on september 11th of this year in libya. of course, our ambassador, a member of the embassy staff and two former navy seals were killed. jennifer griffin had
. there was a very controversial position i took at the time. i am going to be driven by the science. i agree with what mr. gregg said. the natural resources defense council ranked two of the beaches among best in the country for two years in a row. >> do have any advice on how to deal with these issues in the state? >> one of the students is my daughter. she is interested in these issues. i think delaware is a tremendous place. we have beautiful places, a beautiful environment and we have to work hard to make sure we're protecting that. i think a great environment is a bonus in terms of economic development. gov. peterson past the coastal zone act. people thought that was an economic -- it was an anti-jobs. it turned out to be the opposite. because we have such a beautiful delaware bay, businesses want to be here. that is why we're fake -- focused on the bayshore initiative. one of the objections i have is the thing of the power plant in the coastal zone. the pollutants are sulfur trade we have done is we have waived the requirement to put that manufacturing facility in the coastal zone. we
now, sprinkles here and there, no big deal. 59 at the airport and 62 at the maryland science center. a breezy day today but strongest coming in tomorrow, winds staying between 10 and 20 miles per hour during the day today. temperatures won't move much, upper 60's, -- upper 50's, low 60's. i've plotted some of the strongest wind guests as of the last hour. winds gusting close to 40 at the beach later on today and ava marie is down there. radar picking up heavy rain, outer bands of the storm that's way down to our south but along the delaware line on the eastern shore, heavy rain going on. sprinkles around baltimore and i suspect it will stay that way the next couple of hours but heavier rain shifting towards baltimore later today. here's the latest satellite imagery on sandy, a healthy looking storm, nice banding features, wrapping around the center so sustained winds still 75 miles per hour and it is technically still a hurricane. it's a few hundred miles off the coast of the carolinas. this is a gigantic storm with a huge wind field, 400 to 500 miles across. we will get into it eit
undecided voters. so what should they do? larry sabato is the professor of political science at the university of virginia. he joins us now. we have a week left. i think we just got note that president obama will resume campaigning, according to aides, in nevada, colorado, wisconsin, tomorrow. is this a smart thing? is this what he should be doing? >> well, look, the storm has served as a circuit breaker on the campaign. it's like we have to restart all over again and the candidates, both of them, have to whip up enthusiasm again among the base. it's amazing how quickly people's attention will turn to something else. i think everybody can do that. everybody knows the election is next tuesday. the stakes are very high. so look, we have to get back to campaigning. there is no question about it. it's big election. >> eric: what about for mitt romney? he stepped aside. he said, i'm not going to campaign. he even stopped fundraising. said send the money to fema or emergency assistance instead. when is it time for mitt romney to really start bearing down again on the campaign? >> w
impact, but political science literature 2 to 3% in their states. wisconsin was close in 2000 and 2004. it was won by al gore by 5500 votes and it was won by john kerry by 11,000 votes and both of those are significantly less, 2 to 3% of the vote so paul ryan has an effect in wisconsin sort of like 2000, 2004. could make the difference, late movement in nevada both candidates have been going there, and president obama has not been able to get 50 or above on a consistent basis, it's essentially, 48, 46, 47, 47 race on a good day for romney. in new hampshire, next-door neighbor, bush won new hampshire in 2000 and lost it in 2004 in part because new hampshiritis were comfortable from the next door state, john kerry. >> clayton: and ohio, the president has been there 22 times and romney upwards, more that that, what do you think about ohio. >> here is an interesting white board for you to look at. i thinkoee is dead even, it's a very close race. take a look the at the absentee ballot request, four years ago, 33% came from people who participated in the democratic primaries and 19% for repu
is there for a specific reason and not in manchester, 20 miles to the north. there is a lot of science to this. there is a lot of polling that goes into it. it is very strategic. we have had a lot of candidates here for the primary. we have had a lot of exposure to them. certainly, voters here are knowledgeable about who these people are after going through the primary. the different debates that go on. host: neil levesque, executive director of the new hampshire institute for politics, thank you. there are four electoral votes at stake in new hampshire, and it is considered a tight race. it's history of being a swing state continues as it is on our list. our conversation continues about the battle states, the battleground state of new hampshire with -- our competition continues about the battleground states of new hampshire. kathy sullivan is the chairwoman of the democratic party. she tried to us from manchester this morning. if i could begin with the "washington post" piece. republicans say that romney's team is far ahead of what senator john mccain had in place for years ago. but the exten
is what happened with that coverup in benghazi. you know, they said early there were no warning science. we have, at this network chronicled between half a dozen and a dozen of them. here another one, looks like a smoking gun a secret cable that said they had this emergency meeting three weeks before those guys were murdered. you know what? the consulate not safe. we should probably go ahead and hide out over at the cia outp away. nobody did anything. >> no, they didn't. there ought to be a pulitzer prize for catherine herridge and jennifer griffin at staff at fox news they have done yo men's work to get the truth out. >> first to say the government lied to us and now they are covering it up. it's becoming more clear every day. clear danger in benghazi. indication that the reason that the ambassador went there really secretly and quietly because he knew it was a treacherous place to be. why we haven't admitted that the only thing you can imagine is that we just don't want to admit that, you know, bin laden may be dead. but al qaeda is very much alive. it's the ambassador who is dead. do
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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